SUCCESSFUL TRIAL – MESH EYE SWEET ITCH MASK

SUCCESSFUL TRIAL – MESH EYE SWEET ITCH MASK

The NEW @snuggyhoods mesh eye sweet itch/fly mask is currently being trialed by a number of customers. This is a before $ after photo having used the mask for about a month. The difference is great!

Watch this space!!! If you have any questions then please do not hesitate to get in touch.

01225 783399

sales@snuggyhoods.com

Snuggy Hoods are heading to Olympia !!

Snuggy Hoods are heading to Olympia !!

Please pop in to check out the fabulous range of products on offer, there shall be great offers across all products available. This year the Snuggy Hoods trade stand shall be in a NEW LOCATION, we can be found on stand E53, a bigger and better stand with more to offer for your christmas shopping.

We look forward to greeting all of our customers old and new.

Thank you to all of our FABULOUS Customers!

A big thank you to all of our wonderful customers who came to visit the Snuggy Hoods Trade Stand at Your Horse Live 2017!

We had a fantastic show and look forward to seeing you all again next year!!!  For anyone who is heading to Olympia do be sure to pop in and say hi!!

Thanks again from the Snuggy Hoods Team!

Snuggy Hoods Sponsored Rider – Natalie Povey’s Latest Blog

Blog for August 2017

This month we have been working on Fulltide’s suppleness – we have been doing lots of leg yielding and shoulder in as well as working on the smaller circles in walk and trot. Our leg yielding has been a challenge, but I can say we have found the right buttons on the left rein leg yielding right but the on the right rein leg yielding left, it is more of a challenge and is still working progress so we practice a little each time we school then change the subject to something different as it is something we have both been struggling with, its not that Fulltide finds it difficult, it’s because of my weaker side so I am finding it more difficult to get the aids right.

We have also been working on our medium trot which is improving all the time and Fulltide has now started to lift through the shoulder and push from behind. We have been working on two different exercises to improve the medium trot but I have only been asking for medium trot for a few strides until she gets stronger and more balanced otherwise she looses her balance and rushes. The first one is working on a square and collecting the trot going around the four corners then asking for a bigger trot on the long sides of the square – this exercise really gets Fulltide thinking and listening to what I am asking. The second exercise that we have been working on is asking for a shoulder in position for a few strides coming out of the corners then straightening her up and asking for medium trot for a few strides and brining her back.

Our downward transitions have also been our focus this month making sure they are smooth and that Fulltide listens to my aids as she can be a little delayed to come back to me from trot so we have been using the school markers to perfect our transitions as well as making sure Fulltide stays soft, relaxed and forward as sometimes she tries to hard and we end up with her coming back a little to much. I am pleased to say they are much improved.

I have also achieved a life long ambition this month and have learnt myself to canter with Fulltide’s help, it is something that I had always thought would be impossible but have always wanted to do. She is such an amazing little horse who tries her upmost to do her best for her rider and has a lovely canter, which gave me the confidence to try as I know she won’t do anything. We had a few misunderstandings at first as she wasn’t sure what I was asking and it was as if she was saying ‘Mum we don’t canter do we?’ but she grew in confidence and trusted me to achieve what I was asking. The canter is far from perfect as I am struggling keeping my balance but it is getting better each time – we started off just cantering along the long side then trotting for the corners but on a good day which are getting more frequent now I am getting the hang on the canter we manage to canter along the long side and do a 20 metre circle. Fulltide is such a good girl as once in canter if I ask her to trot she comes straight back to trot. My next goal and I mean future goal would be to have a go at an able bodied Prelim test.

We have also been doing a little bit of pole work and some tiny jumps to keep Fultide’s work varied, which we both enjoy.

Introducing Snuggy Hoods sponsored rider Louise Rich

My name is Louise Rich I am 23 years old and I work for B&W Equine group

as well as being an equine sports massage therapist.

I compete in endurance with my own homebred Arabs, I have 5 competition

horses in total, two of them are at FEI level one being 2* & the other 4*.

These two horses Cziko & Czamak are my international Team GBR horses. Czamak

hasn’t yet completed a 160km but that is the plan for next year, Cziko on the other hand has been on many Development squad teams travelling to Mont Le Soie in Belgium. He was selected for the Young Rider World Championships in Abu Dhabi in 2010 and gained a bronze medal in the 2012 Young Rider European Championships In Belgium he is qualified for the European Championships this year which have just past & the World Championships for Seniors next year.

My other two horses, Czarena & Czelo are my national horses who do up to 160km over two days these two are 17 & 18 so they tend to be my fun horses now who don’t do a huge amount of big distances anymore.

Finally my youngest horse Czelection ‘Dude’ is 5 years old so he is just starting work but the aim in future is that he will become a member of Team GBR.

I’ll be posting regular blogs on what we are getting up to!

Lou

Snuggy Hoods is proud to sponsor Clayton Fredericks

Clayton is excited to announce a new sponsorship deal with Snuggy Hoods, specialising in original horse wear www.snuggyhoodsusa.com

Snuggy Hoods offers premium blankets and hoods for horses to protect them from the elements. Rain or Shine, Snow and Mud, insects and UV damage.

Clayton said, I am really grateful for the opportunity to enter into a new sponsorship agreement with Snuggy Hoods. When I was based in the UK these products were an essential part of my program, enabling me to have my horses coats looking their best regardless of the weather conditions. It is exciting that Snuggy Hoods is now available in the U.S. and I would recommend their products 100%. Yard favorites include the Bug Body Horse Fly Sheet to protect your horse outdoors and the Slinky Show Stretch Hood to have your horse looking it is best while competing.

Other products in the range include:

Silky Anti-Rub Horse Shoulder Guard

Anti-Itch Horse Mask

Slinky Show Stretch Lycra Blanket

Turn Out Weatherproof Horse Hood

Fencing Your Horse Paddock

Horse owners invest a great deal of money into rugs for their horses on an annual basis, many of which are rapidly destroyed by their beloved horses and ponies rubbing against sharp objects in the field causing rugs to snag, rip and tear. If there is a way to endure your rugs lifespan then certainly it is worth knowing about. The problem can be easily rectified and does need to put you out of pocket.

When buying horse fencing, you will face many options. Each type of fencing has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, from cost to safety to ease of installation. This blog is going to talk through a number of fencing options that you may want to consider when buying fencing for your horses.

POST & RAIL FENCING

Wooden rail fencing is expensive, and also requires regular ongoing maintenance. The fencing must be sanded, primed, and painted as it ages, and broken or splintered boards must be replaced. You should also always check wooden fencing regularly to be sure that nails have not worked loose and that the fence posts are still secure. Wooden fencing, while strong, can also splinter and injure a horse if the horse runs into the fence. Post and rail fencing certainly looked the part although horses often have a tendency to chew the rails which results in your needing to often replace areas.

Post & rail fencing combined with an electrified metal strand of wire running around the top posts is an extremely popular and effective fencing combination. Putting a stop to any chewing of the rails, once a horse has been zapped they are unlikely to try it again. The electric fencing also prevents horses leaning or rubbing on the fencing causing it to loosen or break.

BARBED WIRE

Barbed wire is not a safe fencing for horses. Its barbs can quickly tear into a horses thin skin, and if a horse becomes tangled in barbed wire, the injuries can be devastating. Barbed wire has little visibility, meaning that the chances that a horse will become entangled in the fence are higher. Additionally, barbed wire requires regular maintenance to keep the fence tight and avoid slack.

If your field is already fenced with barbed wire or you dual graze with cattle then there are alternate options to reduce the risk of damage to your horse and its rugs on barbed wire. Electric fencing is extremely effective for horses when assembled correctly, a temporary electric fence can be erected approx 2 meters in from the barbed wire fencing to avoid any contact.

ELECTRIC FENCING

Temporary Electric Fencing

Electric fencing can be set up as a temporary containment fence, or in combination with wooden strainer posts at corners and ends, will act as a low cost semi-permanent fence. A temporary electric fence can be used for strip grazing, or for keeping horses away from dangerous areas such as near barbed wire or ditched and each other.

Permanent Electric Fencing

Permanent electric fencing i.e. post and electric rail costs between 25-30% of the cost of a normal Post and Rail fence and it can be erected in less than a quarter of the time. It looks good, cannot be chewed or used as an itching post. Once erected, temporary electric fencing may be linked on to it anywhere to create temporary paddocks.

The best thing of all is your rugs as completely safe from any rough edges and you shall certainly find they last longer.